Sunday, December 20, 2009

dan fogelberg - same auld lang syne


Met my old lover in the grocery store
The snow was falling Christmas Eve
I stole behind her in the frozen foods
And I touched her on the sleeve

She didn't recognize the face at first
But then her eyes flew open wide
She went to hug me and she spilled her purse
And we laughed until we cried

We took her groceries to the checkout stand
The food was totalled up and bagged
We stood there lost in our embarrassment
As the conversation dragged

We went to have ourselves a drink or two
But couldn't find an open bar
We bought a six-pack at the liquor store
And we drank it in her car

We drank a toast to innocence
We drank a toast to now
And tried to reach beyond the emptiness
But neither one knew how

She said, "She'd married her an architect
Who kept her warm and safe and dry"
She wouldn't liked to say she loved the man
But she didn't like to lie

[ Dan Fogelberg Lyrics are found on www.songlyrics.com ]
I said, "The years had been a friend to her
And that her eyes were still as blue"
But in those eyes I wasn't sure if I saw
Doubt or gratitude

She said "She saw me in the record stores
And that I must be doing well"
I said "The audience was Heavenly
But the traveling was Hell"

We drank a toast to innocence
We drank a toast to now
And tried to reach beyond an emptiness
But neither one knew how

We drank a toast to innocence
We drank a toast to time
And reliving in our eloquence
Another auld lang syne

The beer was empty and our tongues were tired
And running out of things to say
She gave a kiss to me as I got out
And I watched her drive away

Just for a moment I was back at school
And felt that old familiar pain
And as I turned to make my way back home
The snow turned into rain

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Sunday, November 22, 2009

Tonight’s the Night (Gonna Be Alright) — Rod Stewart

KISS - Beth


Beth I hear you calling
But I can't come home right now
Me and the boys are playing
And we just can't find the sound

Just a few more hours
And I'll be right home to you
I think I hear them calling
Oh Beth what can I do
Beth what can I do

You say you feel so empty
That our house just ain't our home
I'm always somewhere else
And you're always there alone

Just a few more hours
And I'll be right home to you
I think I hear them calling
Oh Beth what can I do
Beth what can I do

Beth I know you're lonely
And I hope you'll be alright
'Cause me and the boys will be playing all night

Louis Jordan Let The Good Times Roll


Hey, everybody, let's have some fun
You only live but once
And when you're dead you're done, so

Let the good times roll, let the good times roll
I don't care if you're young or old
Get together, let the good times roll

Don't sit there mumblin', talkin' trash
If you wanna have a ball
You gotta go out and spend some cash, and
Let the good times roll, let the good times roll
I don't care if you're young or old
Get together, let the good times roll

Hey mr. landlord, lock up all the doors
When the police comes around
Just tell 'em that the joint is closed
Let the good times roll, let the good times roll
I don't care if you're young or old
Get together, let the good times roll

Hey tell everybody
Mr. king's in town
I got a dollar and a quarter
Just rarin' to clown
But don't let nobody play me cheap
I got fifty cents more that i'm gonna keep, so

Let the good times roll, let the good times roll
I don't care if you're young or old
Get together, let the good times roll

No matter whether rainy weather
Birds of a feather gotta stick together
So get yourself under control
Go out and get together and let the good times roll

Pretenders - Back On The Chain Gang




I found a picture of you, oh oh oh oh
What hijacked my world that night
To a place in the past
We've been cast out of? oh oh oh oh
Now we're back in the fight
We're back on the train
Oh, back on the chain gang

A circumstance beyond our control, oh oh oh oh
The phone, the tv and the news of the world
Got in the house like a pigeon from hell, oh oh oh oh
Threw sand in our eyes and descended like flies
Put us back on the train
Oh, back on the chain gang

The powers that be
That force us to live like we do
Bring me to my knees
When I see what they've done to you
But I'll die as I stand here today
Knowing that deep in my heart
They'll fall to ruin one day
For making us part

I found a picture of you, oh oh oh oh
Those were the happiest days of my life
Like a break in the battle was your part, oh oh oh oh
In the wretched life of a lonely heart
Now we're back on the train
Oh, back on the chain gang

Saturday, November 21, 2009

Israel Kamakawiwo'Ole 'IZ' 'Somewhere Over The Rainbow'

Kathy's Song Eva Cassidy


Kathy's Song(Full Version)-Live by Eva Cassidy. We know, of course, this song was written and performed by Paul Simon with Art Garfunkel singing vocals. On other occasions, Paul has also sung the vocals of this song. Notice I did not say Art was the first and original performer of this song.

This is a beautiful, reflective, introspective song which is exquisitely sung by Eva. Below are the complete lyrics of the full version. The lyrics in brackets are now included by Eva to complete the full version.

I hear the drizzle of the rain
Like a memory it falls
Soft and warm continuing
Tapping on my roof and walls

(And from the shelter of my mind
Through the window of my eyes
I gaze beyond the rain-drenched streets
To a land where my heart lies)

My mind's distracted and confused
My thoughts are many miles away
They lie with you when you're asleep
Kiss you when you start the day

(Now the song I was writing is left undone
I don't know why I spend my time
Writing songs I can't believe
With words that tear and strain to rhyme

And so you see I have come to doubt
All that I once held was true
I stand alone without beliefs
The only truth I know is you)

And as I watch the drops of rain
Weave their weary paths and die
I know that I am like the rain
There before the grace of you go I

Simon & Garfunkel- Kathy's Song

Simon & Garfunkle Wednesday Morning 3 A.M.

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Saturday, October 31, 2009

Ray Parker Jr.-Ghostbusters

Ray Parker Jr.-Ghostbusters

Thursday, October 22, 2009

Alison Krauss - What'll I Do


Lyrics:

What'll I do when you
Are far away
And I'm so blue,
What'll I do?

What'll I do when I
Am wondering who
Is kissing you,
What'll I do?

What'll I do with just
A photograph
To tell my troubles to?

When I'm alone
With only dreams of you
That won't come true,
What'll I do?

What'll I do with just
A photograph
To tell my troubles to?

When I'm alone
With only dreams of you
That won't come true,
What'll I do?

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

R.I.P. Al Martino

SPRINGFIELD, Pa. – Singer Al Martino, who played the Frank Sinatra-type role of Johnny Fontane in "The Godfather" and recorded hits including "Spanish Eyes" and the Italian ballad "Volare" in a 50-year musical career, died Tuesday. He was 82.

Martino died at his childhood home in the Philadelphia suburb of Springfield, in Delaware County, according to publicist Sandy Friedman, of the Rogers & Cowan public relations firm. Friedman didn't cite a cause of death.

Starting in 1952, Martino was known for hit songs including "Here in My Heart" and "Can't Help Falling in Love."

Besides acting in the Marlon Brando classic "The Godfather," Martino sang the 1972 film's title score, "The Love Theme From The Godfather." His Fontane character is a singer and occasional actor and is the godson of Brando's Mafia boss character, Don Vito Corleone.

The Italian-American crooner, born Alfred Cini, was one of a number of South Philadelphia-born singers, including Bobby Rydell, Frankie Avalon, Fabian and Chubby Checker. He also was a longtime resident of Beverly Hills, Calif.

Philadelphia radio and television personality Jerry Blavat dined with Martino and his wife on Monday night. Blavat told the Philadelphia Daily News that Martino appeared to be in fine shape and that he was shocked when he learned of the singer's death.

"He was the last of the show business legends," said Blavat, who has played Martino's songs on the radio for years. "There's nobody else. The last of the performers. A magnificent voice."













Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Planxty - Cliffs of Dooneen


You may travel far, far, from your own native home,
Far away o’er the mountains, far away o’er the foam,
But of all the fine places that I’ve ever been,
Oh, there’s none can compare with the Cliffs of Dooneen.

Take a view o’er the mountains, fine sights you’ll see there;
You’ll see high, rocky mountains on the west coast of Clare,
Oh, the towns of Kilkee and Kilrush can be seen,
From the high, rocky slopes ‘round the Cliffs of Dooneen.

It’s a nice place to be on a fine summer’s day,
Watching all the wild flowers that ne’er do decay,
Oh, the hare and the pheasant are plain to be seen,
Making homes for their young round the Cliffs of Dooneen.

So fare thee well to Dooneen, fare thee well for a while,
And although we are parted by the raging sea wild,
Once again I will wander with my fine Irish lad,
Round the high rocky slopes of the Cliff of Dooneen.

Hermans Hermits - Mrs. Brown

Pavarotti - Nessun Dorma

Teddy Bear's Picnic 1907

Saturday, September 26, 2009

Leonard Cohen Who By Fire


Leonard Cohen performs his classic song with a mind-blowing assist from saxophone giant Sonny Rollins.

Monday, September 21, 2009

Friday, September 18, 2009

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Cannonball Adderley - Jive Samba - 1963

"Peter Gunn Theme" Henry Mancini

Herbie Hancock Cantelope Island

Leonard Cohen-On that day

On That Day
from Dear Heather

Some people say
It's what we deserve
For sins against G-d
For crimes in the world
I wouldn't know
I'm just holding the fort
Since that day
They wounded New York
Some people say
They hate us of old
Our women unveiled
Our slaves and our gold
I wouldn't know
I'm just holding the fort
But answer me this
I won't take you to court
Did you go crazy
Or did you report
On that day
On that day
They wounded New York

The Cynic Project-Lost In Paradise

Sunday, September 6, 2009

David Hasselhoff performs 'Feeling Good'


Birds flying high you know how I feel
Sun in the sky you know how I feel
Reeds driftin on by you know how I feel

(refrain:)
Its a new dawn
Its a new day
Its a new life
For me
And Im feeling good

Fish in the sea you know how I feel
River running free you know how I feel
Blossom in the tree you know how I feel

(refrain)

Dragonfly out in the sun you know what I mean, dont you know
Butterflies all havin fun you know what I mean
Sleep in peace when day is done
Thats what I mean

And this old world is a new world
And a bold world
For me

Stars when you shine you know how I feel
Scent of the pine you know how I feel
Oh freedom is mine
And I know how I feel

Michael Bublé - Haven't Met You Yet

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Bratislava Hot Serenaders - Herr Ober, zwei Mocca

A recreation of Dance music done by Bratislava Hot Serenaders, now featuring Henry de Winter aus Berlin. This one is a nice example of pre-nazi German Dance Music from late 20ies.

Sunday, August 23, 2009

blame drew's cancer

Rilo Kiley "Silver Lining"




And I'm not going back
Into rags or in the hole
And our bruises are coming
But we will never fold

And i was your silver lining
As the story goes
I was your silver lining
But now I'm gold

Hooray hooray
I'm your silver lining
Hooray hooray
But now I'm gold

And I was your silver lining
High up on my toes
You were running through fields of hitch-hikers
As the story goes

Hooray hooray
I'm your silver lining
Hooray hooray
But now I'm gold

Hooray hooray
I'm your silver lining
Hooray hooray
But now I'm gold

And the grass it was a ticking
And the sun was on the rise
I never felt so wicked
As when I willed our love to die

And I was your silver lining
As the story goes
I was your silver lining
But now I'm gold

Hooray hooray
I'm your silver lining
Hooray hooray
But now I'm gold

Hooray hooray
I'm your silver lining
Hooray hooray
But now I'm gold

But now I'm gold
But now I'm gold

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Leiber and Stoller

Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller are one of the greatest songwriting teams in history. I would have put them in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame if they had written nothing but "Stand By Me." But their list of hits also includes, "On Broadway," "Young Blood," "Yakety Yak," "Love Potion #9," "Poison Ivy," "Kansas City," and so many more.

They joined me on KTRS/St. Louis to talk about their remarkable half-century careers and their autobiography, "Hound Dog," named for the song they wrote for blues artist Big Mama Thornton, which was turned into a huge hit by Elvis Presley -- without their knowledge. When you listen to the interview, you'll shake your head in amazement about how they found out about it.

We also discussed how they wrote a lot of early crossover hits for black artists at a time when they were not played on white radio in the US, how they made money in an era infamous for royalties and other rights not going to performers and writers, how they were forced to write "Jailhouse Rock" and other songs on a strict deadline, and how they were the first to introduce strings into an R&B arrangement with "There Goes My Baby."








Thursday, August 13, 2009

Till the Clouds Roll By

Till the Clouds Roll By
Starring - Robert Walker as Jerome Kern, Van Heflin as James Hessler, Judy Garland as Marilyn Miller, Lena Horne as Julie from Showboat, Paul Langton as Oscar Hammerstein, Dorothy Patrick as Eva Kern, Joan Well as the young girl Sally Kessler Lucille Bremer as adult Sally Hessler, Frank Sinatra as the star in the big finale,
Directed by - Richard Whorf, Vincente Minnelli

(1946) - Color - 132 min
tells the story of one of America's greatest songwriters - Jerome Kern. His list of classics is nearly endless - including Smoke Gets in your eyes, Old Man River, The Way You Look Tonight, A Fine Romance and Look for the Silver Lining. Plus 1000 others. Jerome Kern was nothing short of amazing. This film tries to straddle the line between a biography and a Broadway Show - with mixed results. Still, Jerome Kern led a fascinating life and his songs are as remarkable today as they were when he wrote them.


LikeTelevision Embed Movies and TV Shows




And what a star-studded cast - including Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, Van Johnson, Lena Horne, Angela Landsbury, Cyd Charisse, Dinah Shore, June Allyson, Van Heflin and Robert Walker, as Jerome Kern. With a cast like that - you can expect some amazing song and dance scenes and this movie offers many scenes with the great ones giving a tribute performance to a legendary songwriter, Jerome Kern.


Frank Sinatra has got it going on in the big finale


Part one
Intro, Color, credits, etc. This film meanders between a Broadway stage production and a compelling biography - and such was the life of Jerome Kern. Watch some great scenes from Showboat including Lena Horne just nailing it - and a huge production of Old Man River. Jerome Kern died on November 11, 1945 and this tribute was made in 1946.


Part two
A young Kern tries to take his music to a famous producer and arranger named James Hessler. Hessler (Van Heflin) tells him he's out of the business. Sally Hessler, his young daughter takes a shining to Jerome and soon they are all like family, and Sally calls him Uncle Jerome. After that, they are off to London, because British songwriters are the current rage on Broadway.


Part three
In London, Jerome meets his one true love, Eva - played by Dorothy Patrick. He does his best to woo her - but oh my, not sure about that striped sports coat on the gondola. Just when things are going swell with his girl, Jerome has to rush off to NYC for a big production. Dinah Shore shines in They Wouldn't Believe Me.


Lena Horne performs a song from Showboat

R.I.P. Les Paul



Les Paul, the virtuoso guitarist and inventor whose solid-body electric guitar and recording studio innovations changed the course of 20th-century popular music, died Thursday in White Plains. He was 94.

The cause was complications of pneumonia, Gibson Guitar announced.

Mr. Paul was a remarkable musician as well as a tireless tinkerer. He played guitar with leading prewar jazz and pop musicians from Louis Armstrong to Bing Crosby. In the 1930s he began experimenting with guitar amplification, and by 1941 he had built what was probably the first solid-body electric guitar, although there are other claimants. With his electric guitar and the vocals of his wife, Mary Ford, he used overdubbing, multitrack recording and new electronic effects to create a string of hits in the 1950s.

Mr. Paul’s style encompassed the twang of country music, the harmonic richness of jazz and, later, the bite of rock ’n’ roll. For all his technological impact, though, he remained a down-home performer whose main goal, he often said, was to make people happy.
By JON PARELES

Les Paul, the virtuoso guitarist and inventor whose solid-body electric guitar and recording studio innovations changed the course of 20th-century popular music, died Thursday in White Plains. He was 94.

The cause was complications of pneumonia, the Gibson Guitar Corporation announced.

Mr. Paul was a remarkable musician as well as a tireless tinkerer. He played guitar with leading prewar jazz and pop musicians from Louis Armstrong to Bing Crosby. In the 1930s he began experimenting with guitar amplification, and by 1941 he had built what was probably the first solid-body electric guitar, although there are other claimants. With his electric guitar and the vocals of his wife, Mary Ford, he used overdubbing, multitrack recording and new electronic effects to create a string of hits in the 1950s.

Mr. Paul’s style encompassed the twang of country music, the harmonic richness of jazz and, later, the bite of rock ’n’ roll. For all his technological impact, though, he remained a down-home performer whose main goal, he often said, was to make people happy.

Mr. Paul, whose original name was Lester William Polfus, was born on June 9, 1915, in Waukesha, Wis. His childhood piano teacher wrote to his mother, “Your boy, Lester, will never learn music.” But he picked up harmonica, guitar and banjo by the time he was a teenager and started playing with country bands in the Midwest. In Chicago he performed for radio broadcasts on WLS and led the house band at WJJD; he billed himself as the Wizard of Waukesha, Hot Rod Red and Rhubarb Red.

His interest in gadgets came early. At 10 years old he devised a harmonica holder from a coat hanger. Soon afterward he made his first amplified guitar by opening the back of a Sears acoustic model and inserting, behind the strings, the pickup from a dismantled Victrola. With the record player on, the acoustic guitar became an electric one. Later, he built his own pickup from ham radio earphone parts and assembled a recording machine from a Cadillac flywheel and the belt from a dentist’s drill.

From country music Mr. Paul moved into jazz, influenced by players like Django Reinhardt and Eddie Lang, who were using amplified hollow-body guitars to play hornlike single-note solo lines. He formed the Les Paul Trio in 1936 and moved to New York, where he was heard regularly on Fred Waring’s radio show from 1938 to 1941.

In 1940 or 1941 — the exact date is unknown — , Mr. Paul made his guitar breakthrough. Seeking to create electronically sustained notes on the guitar, he attached strings and two pickups to a wooden board with a guitar neck. “The log,” as he called it, was probably the first solid-body electric guitar and became the most influential one. “You could go out and eat and come back and the note would still be sounding,” Mr. Paul once said.

The odd-looking instrument drew derision when he first played it in public, so he hid the works inside a conventional-looking guitar. But the log was a conceptual turning point. With no acoustic resonance of its own, it was designed to generate an electronic signal that could be amplified and processed — the beginning of a sonic transformation of the world’s music.

Mr. Paul was drafted in 1942 and worked for the Armed Forces Radio Service, accompanying Rudy Vallee, Kate Smith and others. When he was discharged in 1943, he was hired as a staff musician for NBC radio in Los Angeles. His trio toured with the Andrews Sisters and backed Nat King Cole and Bing Crosby, with whom he recorded the hit “It’s Been a Long, Long Time” in 1945. Crosby encouraged Mr. Paul to build his own recording studio, and so he did, in his garage in Los Angeles.

There he experimented with recording techniques, using them to create not realistic replicas of a performance but electronically enhanced fabrications. Toying with his mother’s old Victrola had shown him that changing the speed of a recording could alter both pitch and timbre. He could record at half-speed and replay the results at normal speed, creating the illusion of superhuman agility. He altered instrumental textures through microphone positioning and reverberation. Technology and studio effects, he realized, were instruments themselves.

He also noticed that by recording along with previous recordings, he could become a one-man ensemble. As early as his 1948 hit “Lover,” he made elaborate, multilayered recordings, using two acetate disc machines, which demanded that each layer of music be recorded in a single take. From discs he moved to magnetic tape, and in the late 1950s he built the first eight-track multitrack recorder. Each track could be recorded and altered separately, without affecting the others. The machine ushered in the modern recording era.

In 1947 Mr. Paul teamed up with Colleen Summers, who had been singing with Gene Autry’s band. He changed her name to Mary Ford, a name found in a telephone book.

They were touring in 1948 when Mr. Paul’s car skidded off an icy bridge. Among his many injuries, his right elbow was shattered; once set, it would be immovable. Mr. Paul had it set at an angle, slightly less than 90 degrees, so that he could continue to play guitar.

Mr. Paul, whose first marriage, to Virginia, had ended in divorce, married Ms. Ford in 1949. Together they had a television show, “Les Paul and Mary Ford at Home,” which was broadcast from their living room until 1958. They began recording together, mixing multiple layers of her vocals with Mr. Paul’s guitars and effects, and the dizzying results became hits in the early 1950s. Among their more than three dozen hits, “Mockingbird Hill,” “How High the Moon” and “The World Is Waiting for the Sunrise” in 1951 and “Vaya Con Dios” in 1953 were million-sellers.

Some of their music was recorded with microphones hanging in various rooms of the house, including one over the kitchen sink, where Ms. Ford could record vocals while washing dishes. Mr. Paul also recorded instrumentals on his own, including the hits “Whispering,” “Tiger Rag” and “Meet Mister Callaghan” in 1951-52.

The Gibson company hired Mr. Paul to design a Les Paul model guitar in 1952, and Les Paul models have sold steadily ever since, accounting at one point for half of the company’s total sales. Built of a thick layer of maple over a mahogany body, with Mr. Paul’s patented pickups, his design is prized for its clarity and sustained tone. It has been used by musicians like Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page and Slash of Guns N’ Roses.

In the mid-1950s, Mr. Paul and Ms. Ford moved to a house in Mahwah, N.J., where Mr. Paul eventually installed film and recording studios and amassed a collection of hundreds of guitars.

The couple’s string of hits ended in 1961, and they were divorced in 1964. Ms. Ford died in 1977. Mr. Paul is survived by three sons, Gene, Russell and Robert, and a daughter, Colleen. In 1964, Mr. Paul underwent surgery for a broken eardrum, and he began suffering from arthritis in 1965. Through the 1960s he concentrated on designing guitars for Gibson. He invented and patented various pickups and transducers, as well as devices like the Les Paulverizer, an echo-repeat device, which he introduced in 1974. In the late 1970s he made two albums with the dean of country guitarists, Chet Atkins.

In 1981 Mr. Paul underwent one of the first quintuple-bypass heart operations. After recuperating, he returned to performing, though the progress of his arthritis forced him to relearn the guitar. In 1983 he started to play weekly performances at Fat Tuesday’s, an intimate Manhattan jazz club. “I was always happiest playing in a club,” he said in a 1987 interview. “So I decided to find a nice little club in New York that I would be happy to play in.” After Fat Tuesday’s closed in 1995, he moved his Monday-night residency to Iridium.

At his shows he used one of his own customized guitars, which included a microphone on a gooseneck pointing toward his mouth so that he could talk through the guitar. In his sets he would mix reminiscences, wisecracks and comments with versions of jazz standards. Guests — famous and unknown — showed up to pay homage or test themselves against him. Despite paralysis in fingers on both hands, he retained some of his remarkable speed and fluency. Mr. Paul also performed regularly at jazz festivals through the 1980s.

He recorded a final album, “American Made, World Played” (Capitol), to celebrate his 90th birthday in 2005. It featured guest appearances by Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Jeff Beck, Sting, Joe Perry of Aerosmith and Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top. The album brought him two Grammy Awards: for best pop instrumental performance and best rock instrumental performance. He had already won Grammy recognition for technical achievements.

In recent years, he said he was working on another major invention but would not reveal what it was. “Honestly, I never strove to be an Edison,” he said in a 1991 interview in The New York Times. “The only reason I invented these things was because I didn’t have them and neither did anyone else. I had no choice, really.”

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Marc Cohn - Walking In Memphis


"Walking in Memphis" is the signature song of American singer-songwriter Marc Cohn, from his self-titled 1991 album. The song became Cohn's biggest hit, peaking at #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 and, after being re-released in fall 1991, reached #22 on the UK chart. The popularity of this song helped Cohn win the Grammy for Best New Artist in 1991.
Story
Cohn was a young aspiring singer-songwriter from Cleveland, Ohio. He'd never been to Memphis before; in fact he'd never traveled at all. Upon reaching the South he was very moved emotionally after seeing an Al Green sermon, and underwent both spiritual transformation and professional growth. Al Green is referenced in the lyrics as 'Reverend Green.' It was there in Memphis he met his first wife Cindy, about whom he wrote the acoustic cult classic "Cindy Sue, I Love You". The evocative song contains references to Elvis Presley and W. C. Handy.

Meaning
The song opens with what might sound like an allusion to Elvis—referencing the protagonist putting on his "blue suede shoes." The "Blue Suede Shoes" reference is actually to Carl Perkins, who recorded the song in Memphis for Sam Phillips at Sun Records. Perkins' ill-luck in a car wreck stopped him from touring to promote the record, allowing Elvis' cover version to become a massive hit. Presley's copy was recorded at RCA studios in Nashville. The narrator tells of seeing "The ghost of Elvis up on Union Avenue and followed him up to gates of Graceland." Sam Phillips' studios were called "Memphis Recording Service" and were at 706 Union Avenue. Elvis' start on the journey to fame and fortune (i.e. Graceland) is usually attributed to the success of "Blues Suede Shoes" - and that of "Heartbreak Hotel." "Now, security did not see him" is probably a comment on the story that Bruce Springsteen once successfully scaled the wall at Graceland, trying to deliver a song he wrote. Apparently, Elvis wasn't there.
"There's catfish on table and gospel in the air" marks the dichotomy between secular and sacred. Catfish is the standard Blues metaphor for sexual intercourse. (The word is also interchangeable with the slang expression for female genitalia). "Catfish" thus would appeal to the bodily instincts, whereas "gospel" would be to the intellect.
This interpretation is dubious at best, as catfish is common Mississippi fare, and the tone of the entire piece is nostalgic and spiritual.
The metaphor gains more credence since Al Green supposedly renounced secular music after being scalded with grits by a jealous girlfriend. The lyrics refer to the girl waiting in the Jungle Room. This was the name of the play area at Elvis' Graceland mansion where he and the crew would take care of business (TCB).
After touching down in the "land of the Delta Blues," he asks W. C. Handy to "please look down over me." Although he has a first class ticket, he's as "blue as a boy can be."
From this opening verse, the narrator seems to be following in the footsteps of Elvis Presley, and his plea to W. C. Handy would appear to reflect his desire to work in music. After the second chorus, the narrator talks about Memphis, ending with the line "but, boy, you've got a prayer in Memphis," reflecting his hopes, and the probable reason he made the journey. In the chorus, he describes himself as "walking with my feet ten feet off of Beale," a reference to the famous street in Memphis and to the fact that in times of happiness, one can be described as walking ten feet off the ground.
The second verse describes a visit to Elvis' home, Graceland, where the narrator sees the ghost of Elvis and follows him up to the gates. He also describes a "pretty little thing, waiting for the King, down in the jungle room," which could be a reference to Lisa Marie in the famous Graceland jungle room (It is believed that Lisa Marie would sit waiting for Elvis to return in the Jungle room - her teddy bear can still be seen located on her chair in the room).
The final verse describes the narrator being asked to "do a little number" for Muriel who plays the piano at the Hollywood, a cafe in what is now Tunica Resorts, Mississippi. The line, "Muriel plays piano every Friday at The Hollywood" is a reference to a local artist who played at the Hollywood Cafe, which is a small diner/music joint in Tunica County, Mississippi. Muriel has passed away, but The Hollywood is still there - you drive right past it to go to several of the casinos now located in Tunica. In arguably the song's most memorable line, when she asks Cohn, who was born Jewish, whether he's a Christian, he replies, "Ma'am, I am tonight."

Sunday, July 12, 2009

K.D. Lang sings Leonard Cohen's Hallelujah


Words supplied by Kristen Samet
Hallelujah – by Leonard Cohen
I've heard there was a secret chord that David played, and it pleased the Lord But you don't really care for music, Do you? It goes like this, the fourth, the fifth The minor Fall, The major lift, The baffled king composing, hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah

Your faith was strong but you needed proof You saw her bathing on the roof Her beauty in the moonlight overthrew you She tied you to a kitchen chair, she broke your throne she cut your hair and from your lips she drew the halleujah

Maybe I've been here before I know this room, I've walked this floor
I used to live alone before I knew you I've seen your flag on the marble arch love is not a victory march it's a cold and it's a broken Hallelujah

Maybe there's a God above and all I ever learn aed from love
Was how to shoot at someone who outdrew you It's not a cry you can hear at night It's not somebody who's seen the light
it's a cold and it's a broken Hallelujah

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass 1966


This extremely rare stunning video was shown around the 1966 era. Video compiles of Tijuana Taxi, The Lonely Bull, Taste of Honey and Zobra the Greek.

Bob Dylan When The Deal Goes Down


Bob Dylan When The Deal Goes Down, Track 4 off the album Bob Dylan Modern Times.

In the still of the night, in the world's ancient light
Where wisdom grows up in strife
My bewildering brain, toils in vain
Through the darkness on the pathways of life
Each invisible prayer is like a cloud in the air
Tomorrow keeps turning around
We live and we die, we know not why
But I'll be with you when the deal goes down

We eat and we drink, we feel and we think
Far down the street we stray
I laugh and I cry and I'm haunted by
Things I never meant nor wished to say
The midnight rain follows the train
We all wear the same thorny crown
Soul to soul, our shadows roll
And I'll be with you when the deal goes down

Well, the moon gives light and it shines by night
When I scarcely feel the glow
We learn to live and then we forgive
O'r the road we're bound to go
More frailer than the flowers, these precious hours
That keep us so tightly bound
You come to my eyes like a vision from the skies
And I'll be with you when the deal goes down

Well, I picked up a rose and it poked through my clothes
I followed the winding stream
I heard the deafening noise, I felt transient joys
I know they're not what they seem
In this earthly domain, full of disappointment and pain
You'll never see me frown
I owe my heart to you, and that's sayin' it true
And I'll be with you when the deal goes down.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Soon It's Gonna Rain from The Fantasticks

Kingston Trio´s very last performance together.


The last time Nick, Bob and John sang together on a stage! FC8, August 18th became the last time the original Kingston Trio performed together, here singing "Where have all the flowers gone". There were also some hilarious jokes from Bob, as always!

Kingston Trio - "I'm Going Home"


A FINE performance from the January 29, 1965 episode of "The Jack Benny Program."
Well, no matter where i wandered i know i'll always find a
Welcome at the end of every journey.
There'll be friendly people waitin'.

Chorus:
California would not hold me 'though i loved her timber
Mountains.
Worked her fields and worked her orchids up and down her central
Valley.

I have driven open highway through the golden utah valley
And i watched the rivers gently gliding. i wave my hand to
Friendly people.

(chorus)

Folks who know me call me a drifter. they don't know i'll stop
My ramblin'.
They don't know that someday somewhere somebody's gonna make me
Settle down.

I'm going home, lord, i'm going home. (repeat and then chorus
Twice)

I'm going home!

Linda Eder: If I Had My Way


Linda's first performance of this song from her Gold album.
Music by Frank Wildhorn, Lyrics by Jack Murphy.
(September 11 2001 9/11 911 World Trade Center WTC New York NY, Pentagon Washington DC, United Flight 93 near Pittsburgh)

Linda Eder: If I Had My Way - Lyrics

Long ago and far away
Before the world had come to this
I took for granted how my life would be
Assuming that my freedom would be free

Before this evening shadows fell
I reveled in the light of day
I rarely ever cried, my patience wasn't tried
And heroes never died

But if I had my way
Things would be different
Danger wouldn't come from a sky of blue
Choices would be clear
Strangers would be kinder
Love a little blinder
As it saved the day
If I had my way

Every now and then it seems
We live our lives to such extremes
Racing all around, never homeward bound
Losing what we've found

But if I had my way
Things would be different
No one would believe that a lie was true
Choices would be clear
Wisdom would be heeded
Warnings never needed
This is what I pray
If I had my way

The milk of human kindness
Would seek us out and find us
And color all the words we say

And hearts would come alive
Instead of breaking
No one would believe
That a lie was true
Angels would appear
Children would be cherished
Hope would never perish
Faith would not betray
If I had my way

Monday, June 22, 2009

Who Put the Benzadrine in Mrs Murphys Ovaltine? - Harry "The Hipster" Gibson (1944)



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Harry (the Hipster) Gibson blends jive & barrelhouse as he pounds out his boogie woogie like Jerry Lee Lewis pounding out rock n roll. A hipster poet precursor to the Beats & even the hippies, his...
Harry (the Hipster) Gibson blends jive & barrelhouse as he pounds out his boogie woogie like Jerry Lee Lewis pounding out rock n roll. A hipster poet precursor to the Beats & even the hippies, his daring lyrics occasionally got him into trouble. "Who Put The Benzedrine In Mrs. Murphy's Ovaltine?" is an updating of an old Irish folk song "Who Put The Overalls In Mrs. Murphy's Chowder?" that ended up getting Harry "The Hipster" Gibson black listed from radio play, and put his career on a downward slope it wouldn't recover from until the seventies. While the lyrics now seem tame and humorous, the far stiffer morality of 1944 considered it as taking things just a little too far.

The animation is from the 1938 Max Fleischer Betty Boop cartoon classic titled "Sally Swing," courtesy archive.org.

Lyrics:

Mrs. Murphy couldn't sleep,
Her nerves were slightly off the beat,
Until she solved her problem,
With a can of Ovaltine.

She drank a cup full most every night
And oooh, how she would dream,
Until something rough got in the stuff,
And made her neighbors scream...

"Oh! Who put the benzedrine
In Mrs. Murphy's Ovaltine?"
Sure is a shame, don't know whose to blame
Cause the old lady didn't even get his name.

Where did she get that that stuff,
Now she just can't get enough
It might have been the man who wasn't bad
Not Jack, that guy's a square.

She never ever wants to go to sleep.
She said that everthing is reet.
Now Mr. Murphy don't know what its all about
So she went and threw the old man out. Clout.

(HOPEFULLY UNECESSARY DISCLAIMER:

Ovaltine does not actually contain Benzedrine. It contains: Sugar, Cocoa Processed with Alkali, Barley Malt Extract, Sweet Dairy Whey (Milk), Beet Extract, Salt, Mono and Diglycerides, Molasses, Natural Caramel Flavor, and Vanillin. )

Ella Fitzgerald "SUMMERTIME"


Ella Fitzgerald sings Gershwin's "Summertime". Accompanied by the Tee Carson Trio. 1968 German television show appearance.

Sunday, June 14, 2009

RARE 1st Studio Recording Of "Me & Bobby McGee" Janis Joplin


The first recording of Me & Bobby McGee in the studio. Janis sounds amazing and completely nails it in one take. Is raw and unedited - features studio conversations at beginning.

Saturday, June 13, 2009

Thursday, June 4, 2009

R.I.P. Koko Taylor


Grammy Award-winning blues legend Koko Taylor, 80, died on June 3, 2009 in her hometown of Chicago, IL, as a result of complications following her May 19 surgery to correct a gastrointestinal bleed. On May 7, 2009, the critically acclaimed Taylor, known worldwide as the “Queen of the Blues,” won her 29th Blues Music Award (for Traditional Female Blues Artist Of The Year), making her the recipient of more Blues Music Awards than any other artist. In 2004 she received the NEA National Heritage Fellowship Award, which is among the highest honors given to an American artist. Her most recent CD, 2007’s Old School, was nominated for a Grammy (eight of her nine Alligator albums were Grammy-nominated). She won a Grammy in 1984 for her guest appearance on the compilation album Blues Explosion on Atlantic.

Born Cora Walton on a sharecropper’s farm just outside Memphis, TN, on September 28, 1928, Koko, nicknamed for her love of chocolate, fell in love with music at an early age. Inspired by gospel music and WDIA blues disc jockeys B.B. King and Rufus Thomas, Taylor began belting the blues with her five brothers and sisters, accompanying themselves on their homemade instruments. In 1952, Taylor and her soon-to-be-husband, the late Robert “Pops” Taylor, traveled to Chicago with nothing but, in Koko’s words, “thirty-five cents and a box of Ritz Crackers.”

Friday, May 29, 2009

Rose Room by the Benny Goodman Sextet w/ Charlie Christian



Rose Room was one of the first studio tunes recorded 2 October 1939 by guitarist Charlie Christian after he joined the Benny Goodman Sextet. I love this and other Goodman small group tracks as they are a good introduction to jazz and swing. They are popular circa forties' era tunes, with members taking melodic solos that can be appreciated against the chord changes. These tracks initially helped me 'get' jazz, rather than being scared off by some of the less user friendly forms of it.

The story goes that Charlie Christian sat in unannounced with Goodman's group at a live performance at the Victor Hugo restaurant in Los Angeles on 16 August 1939, at the instigation of producer John Hammond, who had been hearing about Charlie's electric guitar work in Oklahoma City. (Apparently Goodman had not shown much interest in Charlie when he had auditioned briefly on acoustic guitar at a recording session earlier that day). According to Wikipedia, 'displeased at the surprise, Goodman called "Rose Room", a tune he assumed that Christian would be unfamiliar with. Unknown to Goodman, Charles had been reared on the tune, and he came in with his solo — which was to be the first of about twenty, all of them different, all unlike anything Goodman had heard before. That version of "Rose Room" lasted forty minutes; by its end, Christian was in the band. In the course of a few days, Christian went from making $2.50 a night to making $150 a week'.

Also worth noting are Benny's lovely clarinet playing and tone, Lionel Hampton's vibes, and the sextet's playing generally. I never thought I would get into this sort of music (preferring rock and pop) but this stuff is worth exploring. If you like this tune, check out Charlie's other recorded tracks with Benny Goodman, as well as some of his more extended soloing live at Minton's and Monroe's. (Regarding the latter, see my Charlie Christian videos for Stompin' at the Savoy and Swing to Bop as examples).

Sadly there is no film footage of this sextet, so I have put together a slide show using images of the actual members who played on the track. Note that at the beginning of the video, the last two Sextet names are smaller than the others. This was not intentional, but something that happened when converting to a Windows file.

Friday, May 22, 2009

The killers - Human Dancer/Denser


Here is a complete breakdown of the song.

One of the first times I found the theme so blatantly stated. Literally the theme is "are we human? Or are we Puppets?"
(my own interpretation and may contain errors)
(note that the dancer is a puppet on strings being forced to dance with everyone else, like everyone else)

I did my best to notice,
When the call came down the line.
(called meaning the strings are pulling the puppet, metaphor for society pulling him to one direction)
Up to the platform of surrender,
(refering to a stage where the "dancers" surrender their individuality)
I was brought, but I was kind.
(Feels he shouldnt because he wants to express individuality hence the note that he was "kind" an emotion)
But sometimes I get nervous,
When I see an open door.
(nervous and considering standing for his individuality, going against the expectations society demands)
Close your eyes,
Clear your heart.

Cut the coard.
(refering to a puppets strings that he wants cut so he may find out if he is "human")
[Chorus]
Are we human?
Or are we dancer?
(explained in the video)
My sign is vital,
My hands are cold.
(Imagery referencing a puppet)
And I'm on my knees,
(the cords were cut and hes a limp puppet on his knees)
Looking for the answer.
Are we human?
Or are we dancer?

Pay my respects to grace and virtue,
Send my condolences to good.
Give my regards to soul and romance,
They always did the best they could.
And so long to devotion,
You taught my everything I know.
Wave goodbye, Wish me well.
(this whole verse is simulating what the "dancers" of this generation do. Give up their personal emotion and individuality to become the dancing puppets)

You've gotta let me go.
(letting go over their sense of self)

[Chorus]
Are we human?
Or are we dancer?
My sign is vital,
My hands are cold.
And I'm on my knees,
Looking for the answer.
Are we human?
Or are we dancer?

Will your system be alright?
When you dream of home tonight.
(will you be able to live with yourself knowing you gave yourself up? Remembering what you had "home" is a strong personal image for dramatic effect)
There is no message we're receiving,
(People have no "message" nothing driving any personal ambition, just follow the crowd to fit in.)
Let me know is your heart still beating?
(Another comparison saying are you still alive ie human)

Are we human?
Or are we dancer?
My sign is vital,
My hands are cold.
And I'm on my knees,
Looking for the answer.

You gotta let me know.

[Chorus]
Are we human?
Or are we dancer?
My sign is vital,
My hands are cold.
And I'm on my knees,
Looking for the answer.
Are we human?
Or are we dancer?

Are we human?
Or are we dancer?

Are we human?
Or are we dancer?

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Taste Of Honey - Woody Herman & His Swingin' Herd

Paul Fontaine, Gerry Lamy, Bill Chase, Dave Gale, Billy Hunt (t), Phil Wilson, Henry Southall, Bob Rudolph (tb), Woody Herman (as), Sal Nistico, Jackie Stevens, Bobby Jones (ts), Frank Hittner (bar...
Paul Fontaine, Gerry Lamy, Bill Chase, Dave Gale, Billy Hunt (t), Phil Wilson, Henry Southall, Bob Rudolph (tb), Woody Herman (as), Sal Nistico, Jackie Stevens, Bobby Jones (ts), Frank Hittner (bars), Nat Pierce (p), Chuck Andrus (b), Jake Hanna (d). June 1, 1963.